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Thursday, February 25, 2016

Factory #2

Factory #2 was constructed in the early 1900s for the production of the revolutionary, yet dangerous new technology known as the Turbo Encabulator. The Turbo Encabulator supplied inverse reactive current for use in unilateral phase detractors while simultaneously and automatically synchronizing cardinal grammeters. While this was an exciting new technology for obvious reasons, it also had major safety issues associated with its use. For example, the dingle arm was subject to harsh terminal inflection points which caused catastrophic failure to the magneto reluctance capacitor. When the spurthing bearings in the capacitor were heated up beyond the cooling capacity of the hydrocoptic marsal veins, the entire converter unit was capable of initiating a fission reaction and subsequently exploding through the dorsal extraction point.

By 1978, there were 100,000 fatalities directly related to the use of their products. Families and Next of Kin filed a class action lawsuit. The suit was tied up in courts for years as a result of improper filing. Specifically, form 420(a) which pertained to the shareholders' derivative action was sequestered by the philharmonic severance council. The simultaneous action death act was instated to resolve the legal "sine qua non". Eventually, 10 years later, the Solicitor General had to get involved and it seemed like progress would finally be made and families would recoup some of their speculative damages. But soon it was discovered that the Solicitor General was married to the CEO's daughter in law. Furthermore, she was employed with a hitherto undisclosed government entity which was the Corporation's biggest client. As it turned out, the Federal Government was using the Turbo Encabulator in "black ops" projects overseas and as a result, this became a national security issue. Eventually the government discontinued use of the device and the lawsuit was once again pushed forward now decades later. The families eventually won the settlement and the corporation filed bankruptcy. After the factory was sold, it was converted to an asbestos manufacturing plant and it continued production in this capacity until it ultimately shut down about 5 years ago.

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Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

Factory #2 © 2016 sublunar

1 comment:

  1. I got fully versed in this in one of my favorite Dr. Who episodes. Hoped to see the Tarus, but you must not have been there at the right time. But you know how that Timey-Wimey stuff goes.

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